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[plethora_teaserbox title=”Health Survey” subtitle=”Take the survey” teaser_link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fapp.maptionnaire.com%2Fen%2F4071||target:%20_blank|” link_title=”1″ boxed_styling=”boxed” media_type=”icon” icon=”fa fa-clipboard” media_colorset=”transparent” text_colorset=”transparent” button_display=”0″ same_height=”same_height_col”][/plethora_teaserbox]
[plethora_teaserbox title=”Phase 1 Cities” subtitle=”The first 4 cities” teaser_link=”|||” boxed_styling=”boxed” media_type=”icon” icon=”fa fa-building” media_colorset=”transparent” text_colorset=”transparent” button_display=”0″ same_height=”same_height_col”][/plethora_teaserbox]
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Georgia Healthy Cities

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Good health is about where we live and how we go about our days as much as it is about going to doctors and picking up prescriptions. The Georgia Healthy Cities project exists to help communities better understand how their neighborhoods impact their health—and what local-level changes can help improve their health outcomes.

This research is based upon work supported by the Urban Institute through funds provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. We thank them for their support but acknowledge that the findings and conclusions presented in this report are those of the author(s) alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Urban Institute or the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Our mission is to encourage and support local involvement in public health planning, and we’re doing so by bringing together data and resources to create a toolkit that communities and policymakers can use to effectively advocate for change.

The toolkit will focus on five factors that influence our health and well-being:

  • Economic Stability
  • Education
  • Social and Community
  • Health and Health care
  • Neighborhood and the Built Environment

These are also known as the Social Determinants of Health, and by using this framework, the toolkit will help Georgia communities gain a better understanding of their residents’ health and well-being.

This project aims to help strengthen community partnerships and collaborations so that residents and decision-makers can work together to design policy interventions that address critical public health needs.

The Social Determinants of Health

The conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age, and the wider set of forces and systems shaping the conditions of daily life. – World Health Organization

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Health Survey

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The Georgia Healthy Cities project is working to help your community create better opportunities for a healthy life, and we’re starting that process by learning more about what it’s like to live there.

The survey and its results will help direct discussions at community workshops and provide data, stories and other tools to help communities better communicate their health needs. 

We take security seriously and all personal data is used strictly for research. All personal data will be aggregated to the city and census tract geographies and no identifiable personal data will be published. Please read our private policy document.

Health Survey

Tell us:

  • Where you feel safe in your neighborhood
  • The best location for a new library, park, day care center and grocery store
  • If you enjoy attending community events in your neighborhood
  • If there is a need for more jobs in your neighborhood
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Phase 1 Cities:

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The Georgia Healthy Cities project is starting with an in-depth analysis in four Georgia cities: Albany, Atlanta, Columbus and Savannah. These cities each have different strengths and challenges. They set the stage for understanding how Georgia communities can identify local opportunities and advocate for strategies that improve public health.

Albany, located in southwest Georgia, is the 10th largest city in Georgia, with an estimated population of 75,657. The city is a recognized agricultural hub, which plays an important role in its economy, as does the Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany, which employs 2,500 civilians and 500 marines. There are 3 hospitals within a 25 mile radius of Albany. Albany ranks 486 in Overall Health of the 500 largest US cities (1 is the most healthiest and 500 is the least healthiest).

Atlanta is the capital of Georgia and its largest city, with an estimated population of 456,378. The city is recognized as the hub for transportation, technology, government and business. There are 54 hospitals within a 25 mile radius of Atlanta.The City of Atlanta ranks 239 in Overall Health of the 500 largest US cities (1 is the most healthiest and 500 is the least healthiest).

Columbus, in west Georgia, lies on the state’s Alabama border and has an estimated population of 200,303. Columbus is the largest city in Muscogee county. The city is home to Fort Benning, which is the area’s largest employer; Muscogee county has the 6th largest Veterans population in the State of Georgia. There are 9 hospitals within a 25 mile radius of Columbus. Columbus ranks 399 in Overall Health of the 500 largest US cities (1 is the most healthiest and 500 is the least healthiest).

Savannah, situated on the coast of Georgia, has an estimated population of 144,717. From an economic perspective, tourism is a primary driver of its local economy, and the Port of Savannah is the largest single-container terminal in the country. There are 13 hospitals within a 25 mile radius of Savannah. Savannah ranks 424 in Overall Health of the 500 largest US cities (1 is the most healthiest and 500 is the least healthiest).

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500 Cities data

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The 500 Cities dataset, a collaboration between the Center for Disease Control (CDC), Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the CDC Foundation, details city- and census tract-level small area estimates for chronic disease risk factors, health outcomes, and clinical preventive service use for the largest 500 cities in the United States.

The data provides 27 measures of chronic disease related to:

  • Unhealthy behaviors,
  • Health outcomes, and
  • Use of health preventive services

This dataset includes 2015, 2014 model-based small area estimates that can be used to identify emerging health problems and to inform development and implementation of effective, targeted public health prevention activities.

Local Health Planning

These small area estimates will allow cities and local health departments to better understand the burden and geographic distribution of health-related variables in their jurisdictions, and assist them in planning public health interventions.

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Georgia Healthy Cities Partners

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Our method to creating the Health and Wellness Toolkit involves three components: analytics, visualizations, and workshops. Together, these three components combine to create a narrative for each of the target cities that will help the community better understand the public health indicators that affect the quality of life in each community.  It is our hope that the Toolkit will encourage collaboration among community members, local government, nonprofits, businesses, and other organizations interested in or working in the public health arena, to guide future shared work plans to improve health outcomes.

Neighborhood Nexus is the lead organization for the Georgia Healthy Cities project. Neighborhood Nexus, a partnership of the Atlanta Regional Commission and the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta, is a community intelligence project that provides data, tools and expertise to citizens, organizations and policymakers throughout Georgia. Our goal is to support a statewide network of leaders and residents, government and businesses, advocates and service providers with information, tools and expertise that meet challenges, leverage local, regional and state assets, and create opportunity. Visit neighborhoodnexus.org for more information.

Partners include the Atlanta Regional Commission, Atlanta Regional Collaborative for Health Improvement (ARCHI), Clinical Research Pathways, Coastal Georgia Indicators Coalition, Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta, Emory University’s Urban Health Initiative, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, Georgia Global Health Alliance, Georgia Health Policy Center, Global Health Action, Mercy Medical, United Way of Greater Atlanta, Urban Institute and the West Central Health District of the Georgia Public Health Department

 

This research is based upon work supported by the Urban Institute through fund provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. We thank them for their support but acknowledge that the findings and conclusions presented in this report are those of the author(s) alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Urban Institute or the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.